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Covermark Concealer

Cosmetics innovator Lydia O’ Leary turned adversity into triumph when she created a makeup product that could help people with embarrassing facial blemishes. Born with a large raspberry-colored birthmark that covered half of her face, O’Leary was used to getting strange looks on the street. After graduating from college in 1921, she searched for work as a sales associate at New York City department stores.  Despite her qualifications, stores rejected her from front-counter jobs because of her blemish.

Kewpie Doll

The artistic talents of illustrator, inventor, and suffragist Rose Cecil O’Neill sparked a worldwide craze at the start of the 20th century when she turned one of her best-loved hand-drawn characters into a three-dimensional toy. This toy is none other than the instantly recognizable Kewpie doll. The doll and merchandise bearing its likeness remain collectibles to this day.

Optical analysis systems

Ellen Ochoa’s career offers an outstanding example of how invention can lead to adventure. She established herself as an innovative engineer and went on to become the world’s first Hispanic female astronaut.

“Father of the Atomic Bomb”

Julius Robert Oppenheimer is likely the first name that comes to mind when one mentions the atomic bomb. He is credited with the creation of the devastating device in the early 1940s, a version of which was used in two instances during World War II in the summer of 1945. Bombs were dropped on two Japanese cities, and Japan surrendered shortly thereafter.

Innovations in Stroke Treatments

Jewell L. Osterholm, M.D. developed a pioneering treatment for stroke and other central nervous disorders. It was based on the principle that brain food is relatively simple, composed mainly of oxygen, glucose, and amino acids.